Last edited by Kabei
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Review of interaction between migratory birds and Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds found in the catalog.

Review of interaction between migratory birds and Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds

Environment Conservation Authority (Alta.).

Review of interaction between migratory birds and Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds

report & recommendations

by Environment Conservation Authority (Alta.).

  • 92 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Alberta Environment Conservation Authority in [Edmonton] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Oil spills -- Environmental aspects -- Alberta -- Athabasca Oil Sands.,
  • Oil spills and wildlife.

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsTrost, Walter R.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH91.8O4 E58
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 43 p. :
    Number of Pages43
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19419886M

      Oil sands and mining companies feared, and environmental lawyers argued, that the future of tailings ponds in general was at risk. Syncrude warned about any precedent that might be set. In his ruling, Provincial Court Judge Ken Tjosvold wrote, "Clearly, not every space under a flyway should be labeled an 'area frequented by migratory birds.'.   The discrepancy between their model and reported emissions was mainly attributed to indirect evaporative releases of PAHs from tailings ponds (TPs). With the exception of naphthenic acids, dissolved concentrations of most organic contaminants in Cited by:

      Tailings ponds are part of the mining process. The proposed design and location of a pond is thoroughly reviewed to ensure it is suitable from .   High levels of toxic pollutants in Alberta's Athabasca River system are linked to oilsands mining, researchers have found, contrary to the findings of .

    The oil industry reports that the average number of birds that die in oilsands tailings ponds is about 65 a year. But using a combination of observed data and scientifically established averages.   A study conducted by University of Alberta biologists and ecologists released Monday concluded that 13 toxic pollutants found in Alberta's Athabasca River came from the oil sands.


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Review of interaction between migratory birds and Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds by Environment Conservation Authority (Alta.). Download PDF EPUB FB2

Inmore than birds died when an early storm forced birds to land on Syncrude and Suncor’s toxic tailings ponds. In Novemberbirds were reported dead after landing at three different tailings ponds in the Athabasca tar sands (CNRL. Bird deaths reported on Alberta oil sands tailing ponds Open this photo in gallery: A tailings pond near the Syncrude tar sands operations near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Septem   The tailings ponds sit on an important migratory bird pathway used by millions of geese, ducks, swans, loons and dozens of other species flying north in the spring and south in the fall.

Alberta to rewrite oil sands tailings ponds regulations Open this photo in gallery: Oil goes into a tailings pond at the Suncor tar sands operations near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Septem   Each year, it is estimated that approximatelybirds make this mistake, and as many as 5, are reported dead after landing in the tar sands tailings ponds.

Without a way to track the birds that sink in tailings ponds before detection, or fly off and die elsewhere, experts say the true death toll could be even higher.

The Oil sands tailings ponds are settling ponds that contain the waste byproduct of oil sands extraction and upgrading. They are a mix of water, sand, silt, clay, unrecovered hydrocarbons, and other contaminants.

The management of tailings ponds is one of the most difficult environmental challenges associated with oil sands and their existence is extremely controversial.

“Each year, hundreds of thousands of birds mistake tailings ponds for natural bodies of water. As many as 5, preventable deaths occur as result,” said Melissa Gorrie, Ecojustice lawyer. “Under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, the federal government has the power to hold tar sands operators responsible for these impacts to migratory.

ing waste slurry into tailings ponds.9 Every barrel of oil sands extracted adds barrels of liquid waste to Alberta’s tailing ponds, and each day industry needs to store 25 million new litres of tailings Today, Alberta’s liquid tailings now make up more than trillion litres of toxic waste, and continue to growFile Size: KB.

Open pit bitumen extraction is capable of causing mass mortality events of resident and migratory birds. We investigated annual avian mortality in the tailings ponds of the Athabasca tar sands. Inbirds were killed after landing on tailings ponds, with no enforcement action taken by the provincial or federal government.

And in1, migratory birds died in a tailings pond. In the latter case, Syncrude was found guilty of breaking federal and provincial laws on the Aurora mine tailings pond; fines paid went to fund the. The Alberta government has released a new plan for managing oilsands tailings ponds that it says will encourage companies to generate less of the toxic waste water and clean it up sooner.

Further, the government report stated that Alberta’s oil sands naturally leaches bitumen into groundwater, with the result that the groundwater closely resembles tailings water.

“There’s lots of evidence that tailings ponds are responsible for the contamination,” said : Todd Westcott. In the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of Alberta, tailings ponds have generally been considered the primary source of VOC emissions either via volatilization at tailings inlets or pond surfaces.

The Submitters assert that “the Government of Canada is failing to effectively enforce subsection 36(3) of the Canadian Fisheries Act with respect to the leaking of deleterious substances from oil sands tailings ponds into surface waters and the groundwater of Northeast Alberta.” According to the Submitters, tailings ponds contain substances that are deleterious to fish, including.

Areas near human disturbance may become prey refugia when predators avoid human activities more than their prey leading to decreased predation rates and/or increased prey population growth.

Alberta’s Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR) is home to moose (Alces alces) and wolf (Canis lupus) populations and is characterized by extensive human disturbance including open pit mines.

University of Alberta. (, August 30). Wolf behavior undeterred by tailings ponds and pit mines: Study shows wolves hunt moose as usual in the Athabasca Oil Sands. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March.

For every barrel of tar sands bitumen produced (the semi-solid substance from which tar sands oil is eventually refined), barrels of liquid waste is added to the tailings ponds. Introduction The Canadian oil sands. The oil sands deposits of northeastern Alberta, Canada represent one of the few reliable long-term sources of crude oil, with reserves third in size to Saudi Arabia and Venezuela (Government of Alberta (GOA),Giesy et al.,Honarvar et al., ).The oil sands consist of a mixture of quartz sand, silt, clay, bitumen, organics, trapped Cited by:   Sincethe oil sands tailings ponds have been growing by leaps and bounds and now hold a total of billion cubic metres of waste and water.

(About 70 per cent of that volume is water.) BySyncrude and Suncor alone will have added another billion cubic metres to the ponds. MARK RALSTON via Getty Images An aerial view of a tailings pond at the Suncor oil sands mine near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta Province, Canada on Octo Greenpeace is calling Author: Michelle Butterfield.

Toxic tailings ponds are a by-product of the strip-mining. The largest “ponds” are more than 3 miles across. Because of the location and size of the tailings ponds, as many asbirds may land on them, become oiled, and die EVERY YEAR.

Introduction. Covering an area of over km 2, the oil sands region of northern Alberta yield million barrels of bitumen per day, a volume that continues to grow (CAPP ).The waste byproducts of the oil sands mining are collected in large manufactured settling basins called tailing ponds (Nix & Martin, ).Tailings contain water, sand, clay, residual bitumen, heavy metals Cited by: This article originally appeared on the Pembina Institute website.

This is part 2 of a series on the last 50 years of the oilsands industry. Read part 1 here. The sheer size and scope of Alberta’s some 20 oilsands tailings ponds is unprecedented for any industry in the world.

According to the U.S. Department of the Author: Jodi Mcneill.